The Truth from Lithuania

Good to see a Lithuanian newspaper in town. This copy was collected at Tower Hill station, by London Tower and Tower Bridge.

The newspaper’s title ‘Tiesa’ translates as ‘Truth’. A  worthy goal in the right hands.

Check out the website  at www.tiesa.com  or at Facebook here. 

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‘Tiesa’ translates as .’Truth’

Tėvas kamuoja rudeninis galvos skausmas = Parents plagued by autumn headache.

Tiesa is published at 275 High Street, Stratford,  London E15 2TF. That’s as good as in the Olympic Park, as on map here. 

Not sure the advert on the back page [below]  is understood.

‘SKYRYBOS- GREITAI IR PIGIAI
jau 10 metu dirba Anglijos lietuviams’

It translates [I think] as:

‘DIVORCE – QUICKLY AND CHEAPLY
already 10 years working in England for Lithuanians’.

It  may be a reference to ‘Brexit’ – UK’ leaving the EU, although Lithuania joined the EU in 2004.  Or is Tiesa now to cease publication in the UK?

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Wikipedia helpfully explains the long history of Tiesa   in Russian Lithuania.

Quote- Tiesa  was the official daily newspaper in the Lithuanian SSR. Established in 1917, the newspaper soon became the official voice of the Communist Party of Lithuania. After the Lithuanian victory in the Lithuanian–Soviet War, the party and the newspaper were outlawed in Lithuania. Therefore, it was first printed in exile and later illegally in Kaunas. Tiesa survived irregular publishing schedules, frequent relocations, staff changes, and other difficulties and, after the Soviet occupation of Lithuania in June 1940, became the official daily of the new communist regime. At its peak, its circulation exceeded 300,000 copies. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Tiesa lost its official status and its circulation shrunk. The publication was discontinued in 1994.  etc etc

 

The title of the Russian newspaper Prava [правда] also means ‘Truth’. Pravda continues as a newspaper in Russia and as a website, though each now with different owners – a complicated situation,  as explained here]

End.

 

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